pearl-harbor-attack

Today marks the 75th anniversary of what Franklin D. Roosevelt memorably called “a day that will live in infamy.” It seems difficult to believe 75 years have passed, and the day is already marked by ceremony and editorializing for this surprising act of war by Japanese Imperial forces.

Taken by surprise, America’s Pacific Fleet was severely damaged or destroyed by Japanese airplanes, launched from aircraft carriers 230 miles north of Oahu. The attack commenced at 7:55 A.M. on Sunday, December 7, 1941. The attack launched in two waves lasting 110 minutes, from 7:55 a.m. until 9:45 a.m.

For a very interesting and informative account of the attack, visit this site where you can also book a flight aboard authentic WWII “warbirds.”

Steven K. Bannon describes the day as an inflection point in American history and further says, “And I think if you look back at who was serving in the Pacific, in the Navy, and the Marine Corps, the Army Air Corps, in the Army out at Schofield barracks, it’s really the grandfathers and sometimes the fathers of the ‘deplorables.’ It’s that group of people that turned it around.”

America at that time had produced what Tom Brokaw calls “The Greatest Generation cialis generico.” It is this generation that returned home from years of sacrifice and suffering, they raised a generation of American’s – “Baby-Boomers” who in turn enjoyed a measure of prosperity and opportunity unique in all of history in an era of immense wealth, affluence and privilege. These are the people whom Hillary Clinton called “deplorables.”

Pearl Harbor may be fading into history, but its impact may still be felt today – one way or another. A good description of the event, the war and the larger context of the 20th century can be found in this “Briefing” by Al Mohler.

The members and families of Shenandoah Christian Alliance reverently remember Pearl Harbor, and we salute the few remaining survivors of World War II, and Pearl Harbor in particular, as heroes for whom we are greatly indebted.